CREATIVE SOLUTIONS SPECIALIST / ARTIST / EDUCATOR
Exhibit: Dance Portals
Posted 20th September 2016

About

Artistic expression has been prevalent within society, from the early cave paintings, right up to the celebrated graffiti of Banksy; with countless artists translating their own creative energy through a variety of mediums and styles.

The process of creation can be described as a transcendence from the imaginative and sometimes dreamlike metaphysical reality that resides inside a person's own individual mind, into a tangible experience within the shared reality of the world; which can then evoke ideas and emotions from somebody else's mind.

Dance portals specifically focuses on the expressive nature of Breakdance, due to the way that the art form embodies a state of immediate connectivity between the raw creative thoughts of a person's mind and the environment they are in.

Since the inception of Breakdance on the streets of New York, the art form has regularly provided a powerful catalyst for transporting not only the dancer, but the spectators of the dance, into a whole new realm of wonder as the musicality and athleticism on display transmutes the environment into something more.

Each of the 5 animated scenes for this exhibit are representative of the abstract and instinctively reactive thoughts which flow freely from the conduit of the mind, and provide direction for the wild freedom of the dance.

click below to play ↓

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Note: online this video may not loop correctly and could display improperly on some devices

The exhibit is based upon my own experiences as a dancer whereby the difference in environment has transported my mind through a synergy with the movements of my body.

The piece is intended to be a living piece of art that is projected onto a wall so as to appear as if it is a portal into another world, however it can also be installed on a conventional screen.

Note: this exhibit was originally titled Breaking the Mould

The earlier online version of the installation, which was split into a series of individual pieces, was covered both online and in the paper by the Newark advertiser.